How to Grow The Rare And Almost Extinct Eastern Pasqueflower’s

Eastern Pasqueflower’s also known as Pasqueflower’s are beautiful furry light purple flowers that bloom in early spring. They have become a very rare plant and are hard to find in the wild. They are extinct in Finland and almost extinct throughout Europe. They look similar to tulips when fully bloomed. They are a bushy flower and are easy to grow and very fragrant.

Sun – Eastern Pasqueflower’s do well in full sun and partial shade.

Soil – You can plant them in well draining soil but they also do well in other types of soil. As long as the soil drains well these flowers will be just fine.

Spacing – It is recommended that you plant Pasqueflower’s about 3 to 6 inches/7 to 15 cm apart but keep in mine that their roots can spread up to 8 inches/20 cm wide.

Water – They require a lot of water and deep watering but once they are established they are very drought tolerant. For this reason they will do best in areas that receive a lot of rain. If you live in an area that doesn’t rain often you can water then deeply two to three times a week depending on your soil type. If your soil holds in more moister than once a week will be fine as long as you water deeply. Once your plant is established you can water it deeply once a week without fear of it dying.

Food – Eastern Pasqueflower’s can be fertilized once a year after the last frost with a slow release fertilizer.

Annual or Perennial – Pasqueflower’s are perennials and will come back year after year on their own

Climate/Hardiness – These plants are very cold hardy and can also tolerate drought when established.

Note – In some areas the pasqueflower has already gone extinct so finding seeds and cuttings for them could be very hard. People are trying to reintroduce them back into the wild but only time will tell if they are able to reestablish them.

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